Contact Us
  • Wendy Loya
    Arctic LCC Coordinator

    U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
    1011 East Tudor Road
    Anchorage, Alaska 99503
    (907) 786-3532
  • Paul Leonard
    Arctic LCC Science Coordinator

    U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
    101 12th Avenue, Rm. 216
    Fairbanks, Alaska 99701
    (907) 456-0445
  • Josh Bradley
    Arctic LCC Data Manager

    U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
    101 12th Avenue, Rm. 216
    Fairbanks, Alaska 99701
    (907) 455-1847

Geophysical

  • Project#: ALCC2011-02
    This effort will investigate the dominant and relative importance of physical processes shaping the modern Arctic coastline as well as decadal responses due to projected conditions out to the year 2100. This study will determine dominant forces responsible for projected changes to the arctic coastal landscape, and assess the likelihood of Arctic barrier island-lagoon system habitat inundation by seawater in response to changing ocean conditions related to global warming.
    Read more >>
  • Project#: ALCC2011-1002
    This collection of products summarizes baseline and projected temperature and precipitation. The animations and maps are focused on the northern portion of Alaska, while the underlying raster data have a much larger spatial extent covering Alaska and Western Canada (YT, BC, AB, SK, and MB).
    Read more >>
  • Project#: ALCC2011-05
    LCC funding for this project will help maintain a network of hydrology monitoring sites in a representative watershed of the Arctic Coastal Plain. The work is being conducted within the context of climate change and impending oil and gas activities in the region, the latter of which is the impetus for focusing on the Fish Creek watershed.
    Read more >>
  • Project#: ALCC2011-18
    This effort will further our understanding of the impacts of climate change on the most massive element of the landscape that is likely to change – glaciers - and how loss of these glaciers will impact downstream ecosystems over the next 50 years.
    Read more >>
  • Project#: ALCC2010-04
    Water availability, distribution, quality and quantity are critical habitat elements for fish and other water-dependent species. Furthermore, the availability of water is also a pre-requisite for a number of human activities.
    Read more >>
  • Project#: ALCC2010-13
    The Arctic LCC supported installation of a new USGS stream gage on the Hulahula River. The funds provided by the LCC will support stream gage operation for a period of 5 years.
    Read more >>
  • Project#: ALCC2010-07
    If current trends continue, Brooks Range glaciers will disappear over the next century, affecting stream flow regimes, riparian areas, and deltas. We will extend the 50-year record of the glacier's mass balance (annual difference between accumulation and loss of material) and complete preliminary investigations of Esetuk Glacier for a short-term comparison study of mass balance and glacier-climate interactions.
    Read more >>
  • Project#: ALCC2011-03
    This retrospective analysis of precipitation records will determine whether detected inconsistency in station-based precipitation data are associated with changes in station location or the manner in which it is operated, or are related to historical climate variability. It will evaluate actual trends in precipitation using two analytical methods over both short and long analytical periods.
    Read more >>
  • Project#: ALCC2010-12
    In 2010, the Arctic LCC contributed to ongoing stream gaging of the Canning and Tamayariak rivers. Data will be integrated into the LCC Hydroclimatological database.
    Read more >>
  • Project#: ALCC2010-08
    Hydrologic data for the Alaska Arctic are sparse, and fewer still are long-term (> 10 year) datasets. This lack of baseline information hinders our ability to assess long-term alterations in streamflow due to changing climate.
    Read more >>
  • Project#: ALCC2010-09
    Widespread changes in lake distribution on the Arctic Coastal Plain (ACP) would affect water availability for humans, fish and other water-dependent species. The Thermokarst Lake Drainage project will model the susceptibility of lakes on the ACP to drainage due to changes in permafrost conditions and surface hydrology at the lakes margins.
    Read more >>
  • Project#: ALCC2012-01
    The Arctic LCC and National Park Service have partnered together to complete a ShoreZone imagining and mapping project for the entire coastline, lagoons inclusive, from Point Hope to Wales in Northwestern Alaska. The ShoreZone Mapping System uses oblique aerial imagery and field data from ShoreStations to classify coastline habitats based on geological and biological attributes.
    Read more >>
  • Project#: ALCC2012-02
    Understanding snow conditions is key to developing a better understanding of hydrologic, biological, and ecosystem processes at work in northern Alaska, but these data currently do not exist at spatial or temporal scales needed by end users. To address this need, the Arctic LCC and Alaska Climate Science Center have partnered with researchers from Colorado State University to produce retrospective datasets simulating snow conditions for much of northern Alaska.
    Read more >>
  • Project#: ALCC2012-04
    The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management has funded a field effort that will complement ShoreZone coastal habitat mapping efforts along the Arctic Alaska coastline. Support from the Arctic LCC will allow for the inclusion of three additional Shore Stations.
    Read more >>
  • Project#: ALCC2012-15
    The Arctic LCC has partnered with USGS to complete a study that reviews current and past efforts to monitor thermokarst at broad spatial and temporal scales. This background information will then be used to outline possible study designs for a thermokarst monitoring program for the North Slope.
    Read more >>
  • Project#: ALCC2013-02
    The goal of Fish CAFE is to develop a better understanding how linkages among surface-water availability, connectivity, and temperature mediate habitat and trophic dynamics of the Fish Creek Watershed on the Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska. These interrelated processes form a shifting mosaic of freshwater habitats across the landscape that can be classified, mapped, understood, and modeled in response to past and future climate and land-use change in a spatial and temporal context.
    Read more >>