Contact Us
  • Wendy Loya
    Arctic LCC Coordinator

    U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
    1011 East Tudor Road
    Anchorage, Alaska 99503
    (907) 786-3532
  • Paul Leonard
    Arctic LCC Science Coordinator

    U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
    101 12th Avenue, Rm. 216
    Fairbanks, Alaska 99701
    (907) 456-0445
  • Josh Bradley
    Arctic LCC Data Manager

    U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
    101 12th Avenue, Rm. 216
    Fairbanks, Alaska 99701
    (907) 455-1847

Biological

  • Project#: ALCC2010-06
    Contemporary observations suggest that water may disappear entirely from portions of some North Slope stream-beds during periods of drought. Climate models project even drier summers in the future.
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  • Project#: ALCC2011-08
    Millions of shorebirds migrate thousands of miles to spend the summer in the Arctic. There they feed in coastal wetlands and estuaries along some of the most productive and pristine habitats on earth.
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  • Project#: ALCC2011-16
    Using a bioclimatic envelope approach, University of Alberta investigators will project how the distribution and abundance of boreal forest birds across North America will respond to different scenarios of future climate-change. Investigation emphasis will be on mapping and quantifying potential range expansions of boreal bird species into Arctic and subarctic regions across Alaska and Canada.
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  • Project#: ALCC2010-02
    Shorebirds are among the most abundant and visible high-latitude vertebrates. Their ecology makes them particularly sensitive to climate change in the arctic.
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  • Project#: ALCC2011-09
    In addition to quantifying invertebrate resources, this study will assess whether the resources available to shorebirds are sufficient to prepare the birds for their fall migration. This study will also survey the shorelines and consist of taking core samples for laboratory analysis for chemical analysis, population structure, numbers of individuals, and diversity of populations from the interstitial spaces within the littoral zone of coastlines along the Beaufort Sea.
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  • Project#: ALCC2011-21
    Investigators on this project will improve our understanding of how climate drives availability of prey for tundra-nesting birds reliant upon aquatic invertebrates in Alaska's Arctic. They seek to understand how water temperature in ponds on Alaska’s Arctic Coastal Plain regulates the seasonal timing of aquatic insect emergence - a crucial event for a majority of tundra-nesting bird species - and the availability of invertebrate biomass for benthic-feeding birds such as eiders and other waterfowl.
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  • Project#: ALCC2010-11
    Using carefully formulated scientific methods, the Arctic Shorebird Demographic Network (ASDN) seeks to understand the reasons why shorebird populations are declining, such as if not enough chicks are born or if adults are dying. They also do research to understand where shorebirds face threats, such as where they are nesting in the Arctic in the summer, when they are migrating or where they spend the winter.
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  • Project#: ALCC2011-11
    The Wildlife Conservation Society will assess the climate change vulnerability of bird species that regularly breed in substantial populations in Alaska using the NatureServe Climate Change Vulnerability Index (CCVI) tool. Initial work will focus on breeding birds in Arctic Alaska including shorebirds, waterfowl and waterbird species (loons, gulls, terns, jaegers), and land bird species (passerines, raptors, ptarmigan).
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  • Project#: ALCC2012-12
    The Arctic LCC and USGS have partnered together to incorporate historic calving and summer ranges of the Western Arctic caribou herd into ongoing inter-agency research and monitoring efforts on the influence of climate changes on the nutrient dynamics of ungulate forages. Current work on the spatio-temporal characteristics of summer habitats for the Teshekpuk and Central Arctic caribou herds commenced in May 2011 and will continue until FY2014; these efforts are fully funded through the USGS, ADF&G, and the BLM.
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